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Welcome to Microsoft Word Tips & Tricks

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Either you do your scientific research work at school or college, or write an article to the reputable magazine you need to reference sources of your information. To simplify this hard work Word 2016 provides you automatic tools for inserting citations.

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You can create standard numbered and bulleted lists by typing in a way that triggers the AutoFormat feature to apply list formatting.

Do one of:

  • At the beginning of a paragraph, type a number, a separator, and then a space or tab. For example, type 1. and then a space or press Tab. Word automatically changes the paragraph into part of a numbered list:
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  • At the beginning of a paragraph, type an asterisk (*) and a space or tab. Word automatically changes the asterisk to a bullet and applies a hanging indent to the paragraph. You can also type a hyphen (-) and a tab at the beginning of a paragraph to create a "bulleted" list that uses hyphens as the bullets:
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You can turn off AutoFormat creation of numbered and bulleted lists. Follow these steps:

   1.   On the File tab, click the Options button:

2016

   2.   Choose the Proofing tab, and then click the AutoCorrect Options... button:

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   3.   In the AutoCorrect dialog box, choose the AutoFormat As You Type tab, clear the Automatic bulleted lists check box and the Automatic numbered lists check box:

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When you've created a document and sent it out to your colleagues for editing, you'll probably need to review the tracked changes and decide which to keep and which to jettison.

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With all the different kinds of formatting that Word offers, you may sometimes find it hard to see exactly what formatting is applied to particular characters or a paragraph.
Word provides two tools to help you find out: the Style Inspector and the Reveal Formatting pane.

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By default, Word makes objects snap (jump) to an underlying grid laid across the document. If you drag an object, such as a shape, you'll notice that it moves in little jerks rather than smoothly. This is because of the grid - but because the grid is normally invisible, it's not obvious.

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